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HardlyCapable13
07-03-2015, 02:51 PM
I'm an avid BBQ/smoker, and noticed we have a lack of a dedicated thread. Thought this would be a great place to share experiences, recipes, and of course, photos. My current tools of the trade are a 4 burner gas grill for those quick cooks, a 4 burner gas flat top griddle because why not, a Weber charcoal Q, and an electric cabinet smoker.

Here's the smoker.

http://i719.photobucket.com/albums/ww193/jlesieur13/IMG_0055.jpg


BBQ with a stupid photo filter my phone was stuck on

http://i719.photobucket.com/albums/ww193/jlesieur13/FE989153-D8F4-47A9-84D0-74A021C88D41_zps2ybcnymy.jpg


Griddle

http://i719.photobucket.com/albums/ww193/jlesieur13/83C9AEAF-667C-48AC-9802-86342EC990BC_zpss5fonb0y.jpg

Major Stains
07-03-2015, 02:59 PM
Nice setup there HC.
And about time we had a thread for burning food! ;)
I will paste in some recipes from other threads when I get a moment.

PS How do those feet taste after they've been in the smoker?

HardlyCapable13
07-03-2015, 03:06 PM
PS How do those feet taste after they've been in the smoker?

Pretty good. Some people like pigs feet, I prefer human. Hit them with some pecan smoke and you're good to go!

mechatool
07-08-2015, 10:10 AM
Nice setup. I do all the cooking in the house. As far as grilling, smoking, or BBQ I use the green egg. Man, I could talk about food all day.

Major Stains
07-08-2015, 01:35 PM
Nice setup. I do all the cooking in the house. As far as grilling, smoking, or BBQ I use the green egg. Man, I could talk about food all day.

Those Green Eggs look amazing. Bet you've got some fantastic recipes from that part of the world.

HardlyCapable13
07-08-2015, 01:57 PM
Pulled pork anyone? One of the pork butts I did for the 4th of July bash.


http://i719.photobucket.com/albums/ww193/jlesieur13/B4737BF9-39B6-46D8-889B-D7D7686586BF_zps67p0ealf.jpg


http://i719.photobucket.com/albums/ww193/jlesieur13/39D88C60-7032-4360-B7E8-6AAB708E0C81_zpshsgzkt1y.jpg

Major Stains
07-08-2015, 02:11 PM
Pulled pork anyone? One of the pork butts I did for the 4th of July bash.


http://i719.photobucket.com/albums/ww193/jlesieur13/B4737BF9-39B6-46D8-889B-D7D7686586BF_zps67p0ealf.jpg


http://i719.photobucket.com/albums/ww193/jlesieur13/39D88C60-7032-4360-B7E8-6AAB708E0C81_zpshsgzkt1y.jpg

Thank God for screen protectors, my mouth is watering at the sight of that pile of piggy goodness.

HardlyCapable13
07-08-2015, 02:16 PM
Thank God for screen protectors, my mouth is watering at the sight of that pile of piggy goodness.

It was delicious. The pork smoked for just under 12 hours with mesquite and hickory. Unfortunately I didn't get photos of the rest of the feast. Just took these to send to my buddy who was smoking pork at the same time.

mechatool
07-09-2015, 11:21 AM
Nice! My mouth is watering also. It looks like you have a nice bark on the pork. What type of seasoning do you mix up for your rub? I normally use brown sugar, chili powder, salt, garlic powder, onion powder, cayenne pepper, black pepper, white pepper, and cumin to make my dry rub.

I also see you have a set of the Bear Claws to shred the pork. I pick up a pair of bear claws for the same reason.

Major Stains
07-10-2015, 07:45 AM
It was delicious. The pork smoked for just under 12 hours with mesquite and hickory. Unfortunately I didn't get photos of the rest of the feast. Just took these to send to my buddy who was smoking pork at the same time.

HC. I have a Weber BBQ that same size as your new one. Would you attempt a piece of pork as big as that one above, or do you think you wouldn't have the required temperature control as you would keep having to top up the coals over so many hours?

If you do, what constant temps do you aim for and what fuel do you use over there? (We have briquettes/slow burn or lumpwood/fast burn coal over here)

HardlyCapable13
07-13-2015, 01:57 AM
Nice! My mouth is watering also. It looks like you have a nice bark on the pork. What type of seasoning do you mix up for your rub? I normally use brown sugar, chili powder, salt, garlic powder, onion powder, cayenne pepper, black pepper, white pepper, and cumin to make my dry rub.

I also see you have a set of the Bear Claws to shred the pork. I pick up a pair of bear claws for the same reason.

It's a rub I've been tweaking for some time now. It uses all the ingredients you listed in addition to Spanish paprika and lemon pepper.

Those bear claws are great. Really cuts down the time of shredding the pork.

HardlyCapable13
07-13-2015, 02:04 AM
HC. I have a Weber BBQ that same size as your new one. Would you attempt a piece of pork as big as that one above, or do you think you wouldn't have the required temperature control as you would keep having to top up the coals over so many hours?

If you do, what constant temps do you aim for and what fuel do you use over there? (We have briquettes/slow burn or lumpwood/fast burn coal over here)

When I'm smoking meat for that many hours I use my electric smoker so I don't have to babysit temps. That said, I've done the same pork on a Weber. Set it up for indirect cooking. Use briquettes to get the cook going but then switch to wood chunks for fuel (mesquite for 4 hours, hickory for the rest). I try to maintain 225 grill temp. I like to pull the pork at 195 internal temp (average of 12 hours depending on weight), wrap in foil then a towel and rest in an empty cooler for an hour. Then pull and serve, I prefer on a quality roll with a good finishing sauce topped with Cole slaw, and on the side a home made spicy pickle and some smoked mac and cheese.

Don't forget to put the meat on the BBQ fat side up.

Major Stains
07-13-2015, 01:06 PM
When I'm smoking meat for that many hours I use my electric smoker so I don't have to babysit temps. That said, I've done the same pork on a Weber. Set it up for indirect cooking. Use briquettes to get the cook going but then switch to wood chunks for fuel (mesquite for 4 hours, hickory for the rest). I try to maintain 225 grill temp. I like to pull the pork at 195 internal temp (average of 12 hours depending on weight), wrap in foil then a towel and rest in an empty cooler for an hour. Then pull and serve, I prefer on a quality roll with a good finishing sauce topped with Cole slaw, and on the side a home made spicy pickle and some smoked mac and cheese.

Don't forget to put the meat on the BBQ fat side up.

Perfect. Thanks for that. This will be my main mission before the summer ends!

mechatool
07-16-2015, 09:37 AM
When I'm smoking meat for that many hours I use my electric smoker so I don't have to babysit temps. That said, I've done the same pork on a Weber. Set it up for indirect cooking. Use briquettes to get the cook going but then switch to wood chunks for fuel (mesquite for 4 hours, hickory for the rest). I try to maintain 225 grill temp. I like to pull the pork at 195 internal temp (average of 12 hours depending on weight), wrap in foil then a towel and rest in an empty cooler for an hour. Then pull and serve, I prefer on a quality roll with a good finishing sauce topped with Cole slaw, and on the side a home made spicy pickle and some smoked mac and cheese.

Don't forget to put the meat on the BBQ fat side up.

It looks like we cook and and take the meat off at the same temp. I also love the cole slaw on the Pulled pork. I forgot that I use smoked paprika in my rub. The nice thing about the green egg is once I have the vents setup, I can walk away and the temp will maintain through the cooking time.

HardlyCapable13
08-26-2016, 01:00 PM
@Stains, did you ever try to smoke that pork butt?

Just picked up a new addition to my outdoor cooking lineup. The older I get, the more I enjoy tending a fire all day and relaxing with a cold one (as apposed to always using the electric smoker). So....here we go! This is what I ordered.

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/81z8yCTYy7L._SL1500_.jpg

JockoPablo
08-26-2016, 01:38 PM
@HC I have one similar to that but not as fancy. Nothing beats an all-day hardwood smoke of a good shoulder!

Scottgun00
08-27-2016, 01:01 PM
Got my first grill ever (not counting the tiny Hibachi I had in my youth) about a month ago. Went with a ceramic kamado-style grill: Vision B-Series which can be had at Sam's club for a decent price. I'm astonished how great it grills despite my lack of experience. Haven't tried smoking with it but I've heard it smokes like a champ. I just wish it came with a 300-pound Samoan to help me lift it:

https://us-i5.tb.wal.co/asr/180e3add-4699-4a3c-840d-f073cf17a492_1.ce4bb931f35535cc2ebab9c053bfe052.jp eg?odnHeight=450&odnWidth=450&odnBg=FFFFFF

HardlyCapable13
09-04-2016, 03:11 PM
Been messing around and tweaking a smoked potato salad recipe for the last year or so.

I cut the raw potatoes and slather with bacon grease before putting in the smoker, but today I sprinkled with my homemade BBQ rub as well. Wow, the flavor of the taters alone was fantastic.

I also added a roasted habanero pepper in this batch. We'll see how it goes tonight with the company.

HardlyCapable13
09-11-2016, 03:21 PM
Assembled yesterday and got a few mods out of the way. First fire/seasoning today. First smoke will be ribs next Saturday.

http://i719.photobucket.com/albums/ww193/jlesieur13/686A44FD-7804-4D70-9F01-FCE264427AF5_zpsynsrj15v.jpg

SheepDog320
09-12-2016, 08:58 PM
Assembled yesterday and got a few mods out of the way. First fire/seasoning today. First smoke will be ribs next Saturday.

http://i719.photobucket.com/albums/ww193/jlesieur13/686A44FD-7804-4D70-9F01-FCE264427AF5_zpsynsrj15v.jpg

Nice!!! What brand is that? I've got an old country it's not the best but does the job. I also have a vertical barrel smoker that I smoke my deer and pork sausage in. I plan on having a custom smoker built next year. I really like the over/under designs

Major Stains
09-28-2016, 02:18 PM
@Stains, did you ever try to smoke that pork butt?

Sadly no. I don't know where the summer went.
Work has just been plain nuts since April, so that is my main excuse for not trying it out.
But I long for the day when I do actually give it a go.

On the plus side, the farm we are building onto rears its own organically raised beef.
We chipped in on a 16th of a cow (basically a mix of choice cuts), so the few BBQs we did have were mighty tasty.

HardlyCapable13
09-28-2016, 02:38 PM
Nice!!! What brand is that? I've got an old country it's not the best but does the job. I also have a vertical barrel smoker that I smoke my deer and pork sausage in. I plan on having a custom smoker built next year. I really like the over/under designs

It's an Oklahoma Joe's, picked up from Lowes for $299, then put about $150 worth of mods into it (if interested I can post a thread on the mods I did). This is the Highland unit, the smaller of the two Lowes sells (the other being the Longhorn for $400+). To me this is the way to go, as for most smokes it's plenty. You can easily do a couple full briskets. The larger one just looked like it would take way too much fuel to keep heated for most smokes.

Honestly, I'm absolutely blown away by this thing for the price. With the mods, it's an amazing unit that holds heat and smoke great, and super easy to monitor and control (FYI: I use lump charcoal to get things going then strictly wood for fuel).

HardlyCapable13
09-28-2016, 02:39 PM
Sadly no. I don't know where the summer went.
Work has just been plain nuts since April, so that is my main excuse for not trying it out.
But I long for the day when I do actually give it a go.

On the plus side, the farm we are building onto rears its own organically raised beef.
We chipped in on a 16th of a cow (basically a mix of choice cuts), so the few BBQs we did have were mighty tasty.

You'll find the time.

Having access to a farm is a beautiful thing. I do miss that.

CELockwood
11-06-2016, 09:39 PM
So, I used to smoke pork and venison loins on a small electric smoker. Long story short, it's been many years since I got rid of my first smoker and this summer I bought a larger (22.5") smokey mountain smoker. I've done ribs, pork butt, chickens, steaks, burgers, and brisket this summer. All good, some better than than others (my brisket was pretty dry).

Thanksgiving is coming up, and I really want to smoke a Turkey. Anybody done one? Hints appreciated.

HardlyCapable13
11-07-2016, 11:23 AM
Thanksgiving is coming up, and I really want to smoke a Turkey. Anybody done one? Hints appreciated.

Yes sir. I do one every year and will never do one in the oven again.

I prefer a fresh turkey, but if you must buy frozen, be prepared to thaw properly.

The key is to wet brine first. This is one of the rare recipes I have not tried endlessly to make my own, as I only make it once per year (and this recipe is good). Alton Brown is a master, and this is the first (and only) turkey brine I've tried. Take note; I only use this recipe for the brine, not the rest of the process. http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/honey-brined-smoked-turkey-recipe2.html

I place the prepared brine and bird in a 5 gallon Igloo water cooler like this http://i5.walmartimages.com/asr/84281bbc-a5da-4476-b052-388dbd718dbb_1.54289e90bec7cae0f6dc019cb49ceda5.jp eg

I purchased one solely for this purpose, and bleach it real well after using. I use a super heavy glass lid to place on top of the bird to hold it down under the water and ice. I then store that in the garage or on the kitchen counter overnight (depending on how cold it is outside; don't want it to freeze). I begin the brine later the evening before Thanksgiving. You don't want it to brine too long, as it will ruin the bird and be way too salty.

There is some debate out there about a "curing rest". This means you brine the bird, then let it rest out of the brine in the fridge for 12-24 hours. I've never done this as I usually don't have the time. Research more on that if you wish.

When the brining is done, and when you're ready to start the smoker, take the bird out of the brine and rinse well with cold water. Pat dry with paper towels. Rub the entire bird with butter, garlic, and rosemary. I then stuff with aromatics; I can't remember exactly what as my notes are at home, but I think it's something along the lines of apple, orange, garlic, and rosemary. This is personal preference. Instead of butter and herbs you can also use a rub for it, but I like to go for simplicity for a Thanksgiving bird. Truss the turkey and put on the smoker. Maintain a temp of 225 - 250. The key, like all smoking, is to use a good BBQ thermometer (I've been testing the iGrill units and love them so far). I pull it when the thick part of breast reads 160. Again, my notes are at home so I'm not sure on times, but a general rule of thumb is 30-40 minutes per pound. Some say to cover with foil a bit over halfway through cooking, but I've never done that. I use fruit woods or pecan for the smoke. When pulled, place breast side down and cover with a foil tent to rest for 30 minutes before carving.

Hope this helps.

CELockwood
11-07-2016, 12:46 PM
Yes sir. I do one every year and will never do one in the oven again.

I prefer a fresh turkey, but if you must buy frozen, be prepared to thaw properly.

The key is to wet brine first. This is one of the rare recipes I have not tried endlessly to make my own, as I only make it once per year (and this recipe is good). Alton Brown is a master, and this is the first (and only) turkey brine I've tried. Take note; I only use this recipe for the brine, not the rest of the process. http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/honey-brined-smoked-turkey-recipe2.html

I place the prepared brine and bird in a 5 gallon Igloo water cooler like this http://i5.walmartimages.com/asr/84281bbc-a5da-4476-b052-388dbd718dbb_1.54289e90bec7cae0f6dc019cb49ceda5.jp eg

I purchased one solely for this purpose, and bleach it real well after using. I use a super heavy glass lid to place on top of the bird to hold it down under the water and ice. I then store that in the garage or on the kitchen counter overnight (depending on how cold it is outside; don't want it to freeze). I begin the brine later the evening before Thanksgiving. You don't want it to brine too long, as it will ruin the bird and be way too salty.

There is some debate out there about a "curing rest". This means you brine the bird, then let it rest out of the brine in the fridge for 12-24 hours. I've never done this as I usually don't have the time. Research more on that if you wish.

When the brining is done, and when you're ready to start the smoker, take the bird out of the brine and rinse well with cold water. Pat dry with paper towels. Rub the entire bird with butter, garlic, and rosemary. I then stuff with aromatics; I can't remember exactly what as my notes are at home, but I think it's something along the lines of apple, orange, garlic, and rosemary. This is personal preference. Instead of butter and herbs you can also use a rub for it, but I like to go for simplicity for a Thanksgiving bird. Truss the turkey and put on the smoker. Maintain a temp of 225 - 250. The key, like all smoking, is to use a good BBQ thermometer (I've been testing the iGrill units and love them so far). I pull it when the thick part of breast reads 160. Again, my notes are at home so I'm not sure on times, but a general rule of thumb is 30-40 minutes per pound. Some say to cover with foil a bit over halfway through cooking, but I've never done that. I use fruit woods or pecan for the smoke. When pulled, place breast side down and cover with a foil tent to rest for 30 minutes before carving.

Hope this helps.
Thanks, HC. Will definitely use the brine. I've done that with chickens, so it shouldn't be too different.

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