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Danbo
07-30-2013, 07:54 AM
I've seen that Major Stains had posted something regarding Night Sky, which I will have to try out soon!

But I wanted to know if any MPeeps happened to have any decent telescopes or Astronomy knowledge?!

The truth is, I have had a telescope for the better part of my life. The bad thing about it, is that 1. It stayed in the box for 99.9% of that time and 2, I am missing the main lense, making it ubber useless to me. And now that I have come to wonder about the bigger things in the universe, I've found myself looking for a better telescope. I've set my sights on a good deal (75$) on this model : http://www.bushnellaustralia.com.au/productpages/Scopes/Telescopes/Voyager_789946.html


With it, I hope to have a good view of Jupiter and Saturn's rings. With both the gas giants being 5 and 9 AU away from the sun, I have little hopes of seeing them in the quality I seek with my current refractor scope.

Anyone got any educated opinions on the scope I am about to buy?

Let me know ;)

Danbo
07-31-2013, 08:56 AM
Si this is what my new toy looks like. I saw Saturn last night and the view was pretty cool, although small!

5016

This is not my picture, but what I saw last night looked much like it:

http://picastick.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/saturn.jpg

TonkaToys
07-31-2013, 09:01 AM
Nice - I saw something similar when on holiday in Egypt; the guides had set up their telescope in the desert and the pitch darkness really helped.

Danbo
07-31-2013, 09:35 AM
It must help a lot! When in darkness, lesser scopes perform much better!

CELockwood
07-31-2013, 06:14 PM
Very cool. I had a cheap 90 mm Newtonian as a kid, and a few years ago bought a 150 mm on eBay.

Had a lot of fun with it, but the mount was crap and a pain to setup. I always wanted to build a larger dob, but haven't gotten around to it yet.

ustolemygmrtag
07-31-2013, 07:52 PM
Danbo, I would get that one to start. But you will want to upgrade rather fast. The 90mm is a good scope, but you will want to get several different diameter eyepieces for the distance and light vaiances from your surroundings.

If you are really wanting to get serious, get one with a motorized base and real time tracking. Those are the best. Also, get one with a Camera mount or a camera built in for PC imagery. I had a friend that had a $2000 one that he would hook up to his Pc and we could see the flag on the Moon in 1080p. It was amazing. But, it can become a very expensive hobby.

Danbo
07-31-2013, 08:05 PM
Mine is 114mm: 4,5inch. I bought it yesterday actually and saw saturn on my first night.

I am sort of against the motorized one for now. I feel like it will numb my senses, sort of like a GPS: I find they make people dumb on the road.

My next upgrade iwll be for an 8inch Newtonian or Dobsonian maybe. But this is fine for at least a few months :)

Major Stains
08-01-2013, 01:06 AM
I had a friend that had a $2000 one that he would hook up to his Pc and we could see the flag on the Moon in 1080p. It was amazing.

Flag on the moon! Been on the old moonshine had we?
Next thing you'll be saying man has landed on it!
Cuckoo, cuckoo... :crazy:

Major Stains
08-01-2013, 01:15 AM
I love all things astronomical.
Tv shows, visiting observatories, or just staring at the stars and blowing my tiny mind.
I loved these images of Earth taken from Cassini last week, can't quite see my house though.
http://i41.tinypic.com/2dwi91z.jpg

We are all made of stars man! :hippie:

Danbo
08-01-2013, 07:27 AM
Flag on the moon! Been on the old moonshine had we?
Next thing you'll be saying man has landed on it!
Cuckoo, cuckoo... :crazy:

You shouldn't make fun, some people still believe moonlanding and other stuff is pure fiction...I'm living with one :P

Danbo
08-01-2013, 07:32 AM
I loved these images of Earth taken from Cassini last week, can't quite see my house though.
http://i41.tinypic.com/2dwi91z.jpg

We are all made of stars man! :hippie:

Buy a bigger house. =)

I love all this stuff too. Makes you feel small, vulnerable. But on the bright side, makes all the douchebags in the world even more douchyer and seem more ignorant. Makes me sad though in a way to know that the Earth has an expiration date, even if I know we won't be around to see it! Sorta wish we were in a Doctor Who episode or something :)

RATA MUERTA
08-01-2013, 11:21 AM
Sorta wish we were in a Doctor Who episode or something :)

The DOC rocks!! Anyone watch the Science channel? I have been enjoying through the wormhole and a few other space shows they have on there. Very eye opening. Saw one last night on a magnetic star with magnetic field so strong it would rip you apart from very far away. I had never heard of that before (granted I haven't studied astronomy either).

TonkaToys
08-01-2013, 11:31 AM
I love all this stuff too. Makes you feel small, vulnerable.


Saw one last night on a magnetic star with magnetic field so strong it would rip you apart from very far away.

It is astounding how small our planet is... just look at this image!


http://bmnicholls.com/web/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/earth-comparison.jpeg

mechatool
08-01-2013, 01:06 PM
The DOC rocks!! Anyone watch the Science channel? I have been enjoying through the wormhole and a few other space shows they have on there. Very eye opening. Saw one last night on a magnetic star with magnetic field so strong it would rip you apart from very far away. I had never heard of that before (granted I haven't studied astronomy either).

I love the Science channel and Through the Wormhole is favorite show to watch. If you haven't seen all the seasons, I highly recommend it. This is the most thought provoking show on TV in my opinion.

Danbo
08-01-2013, 02:36 PM
I love the Science channel and Through the Wormhole is favorite show to watch. If you haven't seen all the seasons, I highly recommend it. This is the most thought provoking show on TV in my opinion.

Gonna cram those shows in the next few days...thanks guys. Not sure if we have this up in Canada :)

Danbo
08-02-2013, 08:57 AM
I found a great software for star-finding. Its open source (AKA Free) so I'll post the link here and anyone interested can just download and take a look. I find the program most impressive when you remove the "atmosphere" layer. It includes 600,000 objects (stars, galaxies, nebulae and clusters). I think it may be a while before I outgrow this software, if I ever do...

Here's a sample:

http://www.stellarium.org/img/screenshots/0.10-planets.jpg

Beano
08-02-2013, 02:40 PM
That VY Canis Majoris must be mind blowing big. I've always wondered how far and to what solar system our radio signals etc.. have traveled to. When I was young all I ever wanted was a telescope. Never got one but this program looks fun.

Danbo
08-02-2013, 03:10 PM
You can find great used deals online. I got my 4,5 inch (aperture) scope for well under 100$.

As for VY Canis Majoris, check this out :)http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/fe/Sun_and_VY_Canis_Majoris.svg/800px-Sun_and_VY_Canis_Majoris.svg.png

Major Stains
08-02-2013, 05:01 PM
You shouldn't make fun, some people still believe moonlanding and other stuff is pure fiction...I'm living with one :P

I was obviously joking!

Maybe this Incredible Online Gallery of High-Res Film Scans from Every Apollo Mission
(http://petapixel.com/2013/07/21/check-out-these-hi-res-hasselblad-film-scans-from-every-single-apollo-mission/) will help convert those who have trouble believing the glaring truth.

http://i44.tinypic.com/15509ia.jpg

The flag on the moon (not some mocked up desert)

Danbo
08-06-2013, 07:42 AM
Indeed! But I'm not the one to be convinced :)

So...The moon is back in the sky for North America starting this weekend, I hope to be getting some good views !

Last night I managed to find a few stars, Alkaid was the brightest one I was able to tag onto. But even at 225x magnification, it was still just a mere jewel in the sky, albeit a bit larger...

I think my scope is best suited for the moon and planets. I have still yet to pin point Andromeda, but I think the skies I'm working in aren't suited for DSO hunting. We shall see!

TonkaToys
08-07-2013, 07:28 AM
How about the Space Station? Have you looked for that?

Danbo
08-07-2013, 07:43 AM
How about the Space Station? Have you looked for that?

From what I read, it is difficult to catch it with a manual telescope because of how fast it moves across the sky. But I will definitely read into it and see what I can do. :)

Major Stains
08-07-2013, 08:25 AM
How about the Space Station? Have you looked for that?

That is great with the naked eye too.
I will link the site that gives you the times it will pass over when I can.
Worth watching for.

And I think a famous nebula is expected to go mental from December onwards. Need to check that.

Danbo
08-07-2013, 08:47 AM
That is great with the naked eye too.
I will link the site that gives you the times it will pass over when I can.



I was just on the site when I read this post :) Doesn't stay in the sky long!
http://spotthestation.nasa.gov/sightings/view.cfm?country=Canada&region=Quebec&city=Mirabel#.UgJPSdK1F2w

CELockwood
08-07-2013, 06:16 PM
It is astounding how small our planet is... just look at this image!


http://bmnicholls.com/web/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/earth-comparison.jpeg

If you haven't seen it, this is pretty cool....http://htwins.net/scale2/

FeelinKorny
08-07-2013, 07:19 PM
http://news.msn.com/science-technology/giant-pink-planet-discovery-flips-popular-theories


I have no experience with this stuff but I seen this and thought of you guys. Oh and seeing the space station would be badass.

Danbo
08-08-2013, 08:37 AM
If you haven't seen it, this is pretty cool....http://htwins.net/scale2/
Great link! Love it :)

Major Stains
08-08-2013, 04:44 PM
The thing that always gets me about stargazing is that it's not just about what you see out there. It always helps me focus on the more profound questions about here, on Earth.
I mean, the odds of our mere existence are just mind blowing!
Not only, as an individual, they are heavily stacked against you to even get to where you are now. Lucky enough to be sat in comfort on your ass, reading this. Lucky enough to be conceived, born, bought up on a big rotating fire filled rock in the middle of a massive, and I mean massive, void of nothingness.
And to have been given a slightly teasing level of intelligence to make you sit on a dark starry night, look up and wonder... "Whaaaat the fuuuuck!!!"

Just look at a solar eclipse (safely of course).
What are the chances that you get the opportunity to see the moon block out our nearest star for a couple of minutes every so often, just because the moon happens to be 400 times smaller than the sun and also 400 times nearer?
What are the chances?

http://i70.photobucket.com/albums/i83/randallrussell/Blog/solar-eclipse.jpg (http://media.photobucket.com/user/randallrussell/media/Blog/solar-eclipse.jpg.html)


So before I get carried away with all this bullshit. I guess I'm just saying that Astronomy (even on a very basic level) is one of life's pleasures that makes me realise how damn lucky I am.

So wait for a clear night, grab the kids and some blankets, go somewhere without too much light pollution and marvel at what mankind has done for centuries... a massive void of nothingness!

(And by nothingness I obviously mean thousands of tons of man made space junk, planets, moons, stars, galaxies, neutrinos, dark matter, dark energy, yaddayaddayadda)

FeelinKorny
08-08-2013, 05:46 PM
The thing that always gets me about stargazing is that it's not just about what you see out there. It always helps me focus on the more profound questions about here, on Earth.
I mean, the odds of our mere existence are just mind blowing!
Not only, as an individual, they are heavily stacked against you to even get to where you are now. Lucky enough to be sat in comfort on your ass, reading this. Lucky enough to be conceived, born, bought up on a big rotating fire filled rock in the middle of a massive, and I mean massive, void of nothingness.
And to have been given a slightly teasing level of intelligence to make you sit on a dark starry night, look up and wonder... "Whaaaat the fuuuuck!!!"

Just look at a solar eclipse (safely of course).
What are the chances that you get the opportunity to see the moon block out our nearest star for a couple of minutes every so often, just because the moon happens to be 400 times smaller than the sun and also 400 times nearer?
What are the chances?

http://i70.photobucket.com/albums/i83/randallrussell/Blog/solar-eclipse.jpg (http://media.photobucket.com/user/randallrussell/media/Blog/solar-eclipse.jpg.html)


So before I get carried away with all this bullshit. I guess I'm just saying that Astronomy (even on a very basic level) is one of life's pleasures that makes me realise how damn lucky I am.

So wait for a clear night, grab the kids and some blankets, go somewhere without too much light pollution and marvel at what mankind has done for centuries... a massive void of nothingness!

(And by nothingness I obviously mean thousands of tons of man made space junk, planets, moons, stars, galaxies, neutrinos, dark matter, dark energy, yaddayaddayadda)

That's deep. Im touched.

Danbo
08-09-2013, 08:31 AM
That's deep. Im touched.

Quit touching yourself Korny. Big Brother sees you...

Major Stains
08-10-2013, 02:46 PM
Spectacular Shortlist of the 2013 Astronomy Photographer of the Year (http://www.mymodernmet.com/profiles/blogs/2013-astronomy-photographer-of-the-year-competition)

http://i40.tinypic.com/2lmt3z4.jpg

TonkaToys
08-11-2013, 04:15 AM
Is that Durdle Door? Looks lovely there, when we went it was slightly more cloudy!

Major Stains
08-11-2013, 04:58 PM
Is that Durdle Door? Looks lovely there, when we went it was slightly more cloudy!

I think it's got to be, can't think of many more limestone arches that look that similar.
The exposure on the shot is superb.

Danbo
08-12-2013, 07:34 AM
Spectacular Shortlist of the 2013 Astronomy Photographer of the Year (http://www.mymodernmet.com/profiles/blogs/2013-astronomy-photographer-of-the-year-competition)

http://i40.tinypic.com/2lmt3z4.jpg

That's very beautiful Stains. We got an arch in Quebec called Perc; but IMO it's not as nice as this one, and I doubt we can get that good a view from there! :)

Anyhow! I seen the moon magnified over 100 times and I have to say it's a remarkable sight. It's the first time the moon has been in the picture since I first got my scope. I also glimpsed Saturn again, but at 225 magnification this time. It was slightly larger but more blurred. I think this magnification would be better suited with a larger scope. I think I will outgrow my 4.5 inch scope by Christmas and I will be looking at an 8 inch scope. The good news is, the scope I have will not lose any more value and I will be able to upgrade at a decent cost. I'm already excited ;)

Major Stains
08-12-2013, 10:56 AM
Perseids Meteor watch (http://www.meteorwatch.org/) tonight.


The Perseids are the highlight of the astronomical calendar and a must see! They are ideal for those who want to see a meteor/ shooting star for the first time.

And as a special bonus for those in the UK. The ISS will make a perfectly timed pass tonight at the peak of the meteor shower. (See previous link Danbo put up for times)

The house is all mine tonight, so I may grab a few bottles and sit out all night and try and get a few shots with the wife's Canon EOS. I have never been very good at long exposure shots though!

Major Stains
03-19-2015, 04:18 AM
We are all looking forward to tomorrow's solar eclipse.

I was lucky enough to view an eclipse at virtual totality in 1999 and it was amazing.
What surprised me was the silence of the surrounding birds/ livestock, and how many moths etc came out because they must've thought it was night.

(Remember to only ever observe the sun through the correct equipment such as eclipse glasses or shade 14 welders lenses) or make a simple pin hole projector to view the image in complete safety.

Plenty going on above our heads this week, with Jupiters moon stacking up in line and another super moon.
All this majestical wonder makes me want to lie down in a darkened room as my brain fails to comprehend our purpose in it all...

Danbo
03-19-2015, 10:54 AM
We are all looking forward to tomorrow's solar eclipse.

I was lucky enough to view an eclipse at virtual totality in 1999 and it was amazing.
What surprised me was the silence of the surrounding birds/ livestock, and how many moths etc came out because they must've thought it was night.

(Remember to only ever observe the sun through the correct equipment such as eclipse glasses or shade 14 welders lenses) or make a simple pin hole projector to view the image in complete safety.

Plenty going on above our heads this week, with Jupiters moon stacking up in line and another super moon.
All this majestical wonder makes me want to lie down in a darkened room as my brain fails to comprehend our purpose in it all...

We don't have a purpose. We are simply a result. And we can just as easily become nothing :)

TrojanTeacher
03-19-2015, 11:07 AM
Danbo, what do the stars say about your chances of getting a Stanley Cup this year with the Habs?

Danbo
03-20-2015, 09:52 AM
I don't know about the stars, but Vegas has them at about 10/1...which is fair. What's odd is LA is also at 10/1, and they have a high risk of not making the playoffs ;) haha

TonkaToys
03-20-2015, 10:25 AM
We are all looking forward to tomorrow's solar eclipse.


Disappointed that the skies were so cloudy today. I was on a video conference with guys in Denmark, Sweden, Finland and Norway - and none of us had a clear view.
I did sneakily hold my webcam up to the telly (Dara O'Brian Cox was on) whilst they were showing a view from an airplane and the Scandinavians thought I had an amazing view. :biggrin:

TrojanTeacher
03-20-2015, 12:16 PM
I don't know about the stars, but Vegas has them at about 10/1...which is fair. What's odd is LA is also at 10/1, and they have a high risk of not making the playoffs ;) haha

Maybe it's 10:1 that the Kings won't make it. LOL. I'm still bitter about 1993...Kings vs. Habs...Grrrrrrrr....

Okay, back to topic.

Quick question: I've heard that there are telescopes that can find stars for you. Like some sort of motorized thing with a mini-cpu inside. Are there any telescopes that you guys could recommend that could assist my kids in finding constellations and planets?

Major Stains
03-20-2015, 01:55 PM
After a very murky start in Devon, the sun came out at just the right time.

As you can see it was very cloudy and dull with 92% of the sun covered.
But you get the idea.
The projectors I made for the kids worked well, the bottom left picture is a binocular projector I made which casts the image on the bottom right onto a piece of card.
So you don't have to look at the sun to get a clear image of the eclipse.

I was very pleased to witness my second eclipse, but at the end of the day I guess it is only a giant shadow!

http://i57.tinypic.com/2n6chuo.jpg

@Teach. I have only ever had experience with a basic, entry level telescope.
But I do know that for a pretty reasonable price ($100-200) you could find a very good self tracking model. They link with apps and all sorts these days.

TonkaToys
03-21-2015, 12:07 PM
Quick question: I've heard that there are telescopes that can find stars for you. Like some sort of motorized thing with a mini-cpu inside. Are there any telescopes that you guys could recommend that could assist my kids in finding constellations and planets?

I use the SkyView Free app on the phone to show the kids the planets, stars and constellations. That is quite good fun and convenient too.

TrojanTeacher
05-18-2015, 11:16 PM
Haven't posted here in a bit, but my kids decided to buy a telescope. It's an EduScience Astro Nova Reflector Telescope

http://www.toysrus.com/graphics/tru_prod_images/Edu-Science-Astro-Nova-Reflector--pTRU1-13288455dt.jpg

We've looked at Jupiter, which looked like this:

http://i.ytimg.com/vi/4BKlDNEhc7o/hqdefault.jpg

Saturn, which looked like this (only greenish):

https://i1.ytimg.com/vi/DZP5BKJ4M80/hqdefault.jpg

Venus, which looked like this:

http://i.ytimg.com/vi/39Rd7CNgc_w/hqdefault.jpg

The M42 Nebula and of course the Moon. The kiddos are loving it. I did buy an Orion 2X Shorty Barlow to go along with this so that we could see a bit farther out. I use to have an old telescope when I was young and could barely see the moon, this one is really nice. Now, I'm thinking I might go with a bigger telescope so I could see Saturn a bit better. Thanks for turning me on to this!

Major Stains
05-19-2015, 02:57 AM
Great to hear.
I would love to invest in a good telescope.
Most clear nights, you'll find me in the back garden staring up at all that wonder.
Just pondering all those questions with no answers.... (Man :hippie:)

CELockwood
05-19-2015, 05:09 AM
Very cool Teach. I used to have one, and my kids loved it, even in our washed out suburban sky.

Actually been thinking of re-investing.

Ullrsdog
05-19-2015, 08:31 AM
Great to hear.
I would love to invest in a good telescope.
Most clear nights, you'll find me in the back garden staring up at all that wonder.
Just pondering all those questions with no answers.... (Man :hippie:)

the answer is 42...so aren't you pondering the question?

TrojanTeacher
05-19-2015, 09:39 AM
The amazing part is that you can point this thing at a dark spot in the sky and look through it and see hundreds of stars that you normally can't see without the telescope.

Major Stains
05-19-2015, 06:52 PM
the answer is 42...so aren't you pondering the question?

Love the THGTTG reference.

Unfortunately you're right.
As everything we think we know about the Universe is based on Math, that means I have to leave the complexities of it all to our numbers man, Teach.

Whilst I can only look at the twinkley-twinkles in the sky and hope I don't make Gods angry with my pagan ways.

Major Stains
07-15-2015, 09:56 AM
An incredible week for science.

Mankind stuck a PS2 into space to take pictures of Pluto, and it definitely doesn't look like a planet to me...

http://s14.postimg.org/5tday7lx9/image.jpg (http://postimg.org/image/5tday7lx9/)

Major Stains
03-17-2016, 12:37 PM
I'm going to a lecture at my 11 y/o's school tonight, given by one of its ex-pupils.
The talk is by Professor Chris Lintott, the co-presenter of the BBC 'Sky at Night' programme. He is currently professor of Astrophysics at Oxford University.

What I'm looking forward to most is the school has it's own Observatory, state of the art telescope and astronomical camera, which we can try after the talk.

I just hope I don't show my kid up when I call it 'Astrology' and start referring to Sci-fi films as my point of reference!

Major Stains
08-03-2017, 04:53 AM
It's a busy time out there if anyone has had a chance to crook their neck in the right direction!

An amazing chance to see the Perseids (https://www.space.com/32868-perseid-meteor-shower-guide.html) at the moment. I've recently seen so many amazing trails shooting from North to South mainly. Even saw my first double meteorite the other night, as two tracked side by side at the same course/ speed/ duration. Amazing.

For you guys over the pond. Make sure you take some time out on the 21st to try and catch the Solar Eclipse (https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov/eclipse-who-what-where-when-and-how). Well worth making the trip to see 'totality'. I once experienced it years ago, and it is the most incredible natural phenomina out there, and one that won't be around for ever (they have even calculated the last one seen from Earth).

Also, get a chance to send a message out to Voyager (https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/voyager/message/?linkId=40511444). 40 years since the rusty tin can left this fucked old rock we call home, and NASA are offering a chance to send a message out there across space. Get the kids to Tweet here (https://twitter.com/NASAVoyager).


I still love to just sit out at night and gaze the stars. It takes my mind off all the shit going on around this planet, and helps me forget how bad I am at R6:S! lol

donhardeone
08-03-2017, 10:06 AM
Thanks for the Voyager info share Stains! My kiddos will love that...as we all sit outside and stare at the stars a good bit.

They are both ECSTATIC about the upcoming eclipse (https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov/) and been asking "is it soon" for like a month now!!! We only have to drive ~20 miles to be in the direct path!

Siggman
08-03-2017, 10:13 AM
I still love to just sit out at night and gaze the stars.

Used to live & work near Toulouse (south of France) and lived at the foot of the Pyrenees. House on a mountain hill, nearest village 10min away by car so surrounded by nature.
Man, I spent nights with a glass of fine wine in my hammock gazing at the stars when the family was already sleeping: triangle of summer (Lyra/Aquila/Sygnus), Orion in full force, comets, Pegase during winter...
It's been four years since I've returned to Belgium (work) and light pollution is horrible here.
Sure damn miss those summer nights pretending I was Major Tom...

Siggman
08-03-2017, 10:25 AM
@Donhardeone: Definitely do so! You're kids will love it. Saw one myself in august 1999 in Belgium. We went camping with a bunch of others to witness this.
Nature suddenly went silent, dogs started barking in the distance. I remember I got goosebumps all of a sudden...
Enjoy!

Major Stains
08-03-2017, 03:04 PM
@Donhardeone: Definitely do so! You're kids will love it. Saw one myself in august 1999 in Belgium. We went camping with a bunch of others to witness this.
Nature suddenly went silent, dogs started barking in the distance. I remember I got goosebumps all of a sudden...
Enjoy!

That was the same one I saw, and you're right, all the birds stopped, it was amazing. Hard not to get goosebumps for sure.

Gadnos316
08-03-2017, 09:42 PM
That sounds amazing. Unfortunately I'd have to travel quite a bit for the full eclipse, though I heard that where I live we'll see about three quarters coverage.

Siggman
08-04-2017, 06:43 AM
For the next one (full eclipse) here in W-Europe we'll have to wait till august 2026 and 2027. And plan a holiday in south of Spain or Portugal.
Might be an idea to gather some W-European MP's around a campfire... without screens and controllers ;-)

TonkaToys
08-04-2017, 10:03 AM
Wow 2026! I'm in for a camp-out providing they don't have any more wildfires and you don't mind me bringing my zimmerframe!

Gink
08-22-2017, 01:11 PM
While we didn't manage to catch much of the Perseids this year, as they mostly occurred before dawn, rather than just late at night, and I didn't find myself up at 4am, we were fortunate enough to get invited to drive a wee bit north and camp out on some friends' property directly in the path of the eclipse yesterday.

Was foggy when I woke up at 7am yesterday, but burnt off by 8ish and had clear skies and an amazing view of the total eclipse, without having to battle the crowds that poured in.
It was quite the experience, with the temperature dropping, the light dimming and getting a rather eerie tint to it. The short couple minutes of totality was breathtaking.

A lot of folks we know in our town were saying things like "Oh, it will be 98% coverage here, I'm not going to travel just for 2%", but after seeing it, I can tell you it's not a matter of %, you're either seeing the total eclipse or you aren't. I'm not sure I'd go to the lengths some folks did to get a view, but if anyone ever gets the chance to be in the path of totality during one of these, don't pass it up.

We had to take the back roads home to avoid the freeway and secondary highways jammed with out of town/state travelers who flocked here. I don't think it reached the 1 million visitors that were estimated to be coming, but I still have to wonder if Oregon has ever had quite so many people in it all at once. Can't think of too many other happenings in our fine state that have drawn so much attention. We had the car packed with water and snacks just in case worse came to worse, but were able to use our local knowledge to dodge all the gridlock and got back home in a normal amount of time.

It was an experience I will never forget, but more importantly, hopefully something my daughter will always remember fondly.

Major Stains
08-24-2017, 03:48 AM
Incredible. So glad you and the kids got to see totality. Just such a unique experience that really gives you a feeling of total insignificance, and the sheer fact of the distances that creates the spectacle is mind blowing.
I happened to go for an evening stroll with my son on his 13th Birthday weekend, and we captured a few shots.
Amazing the difference that a small pond makes to the angle of our celestial cousin and star.

https://preview.ibb.co/nauEbk/IMG_0480.jpg (https://ibb.co/gJYkhQ)

https://preview.ibb.co/gm8J2Q/IMG_0484.jpg (https://ibb.co/eDYkhQ)

Gink
08-24-2017, 12:49 PM
Beautiful pictures Stains! All my attempts to caputure the moment using a sub-par phone camera and my total lack of photography skills unsurprisingly failed horribly.
Pretty cool to see, and think about how this event was seen in so many different places, times of day, etc.

GRRowl74
08-25-2017, 09:20 AM
https://preview.ibb.co/nauEbk/IMG_0480.jpg (https://ibb.co/gJYkhQ)

https://preview.ibb.co/gm8J2Q/IMG_0484.jpg (https://ibb.co/eDYkhQ)

This is all CGI. Us flat earthers know this for a fact. It's real bad resolution too, look - you can see the pixels! Still, beats that fake moon landing in the sixties when Armstrong and his buddies got high on LSD and jumped around in a big old NASA barn with goldfish bowls on their heads! Where's the proof is what I wanna know! 🤡

But great pictures.

Major Stains
08-25-2017, 10:56 AM
This is all CGI. Us flat earthers know this for a fact. It's real bad resolution too, look - you can see the pixels! Still, beats that fake moon landing in the sixties when Armstrong and his buddies got high on LSD and jumped around in a big old NASA barn with goldfish bowls on their heads! Where's the proof is what I wanna know!

But great pictures.

If you look at your hand close enough you can see the pixels, but don't tell anyone because the government doesn't want you knowing that.
:spy: