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  1. #21
    Site Admin Gink's Avatar
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    I spent a fair amount of time today trying to trace existing coax lines and hoping to fish some string to pull ethernet cables. Ended up being quite frustrated. The wire tracer I picked up diappointed. Losing track of things after 7-10', and I eventually realized I was dealing with at least 2 separate installs of cable, and many of the lines coming out of walls or ceilings don't go to anything at all.

    I was really hoping to just run 2 cat lines up a single wall, and a 3rd down another wall. 20' Max per run.

    In the end, I half gave up. Ordered a set of TP-Link AV1000 powerline adapters. Not super high end, only $40, but should at least allow the wifi router to go upstairs and still have all our media devices connected downstairs. Worth the money to appease the wife with stable wifi.

    Also picked up 100' of cat7 though. This ain't over yet.

    Sent from my ONEPLUS A3000 using Tapatalk

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    Major Stains (04-23-2017), SouthtownSlayer (04-26-2017)

  3. #22
    Site Admin Gink's Avatar
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    Hooked up the TP-Link AV1000 adapters yesterday. Pretty surprised at how well they work.
    After reading many reviews and writeups on powerline adapters, and deciding to just go for the $40 set as a "temporary" solution, I can say that for most folks, there shouldn't be any reason to spend $80, $100 or more for the "better" 1000's or the 1200 and 2000 models that are out now.

    Directly cabled to my router I can get speeds of 100-110mbps. Connected to the AC wifi I get nearly that much. With these cheapo powerline adapters, 1 plugged into the router upstairs, and the other down in the basement, my old server built from outdated spare parts can easily hit 70-80mbps download speeds. Chances are there's as much speed being lost to the outdated SATA controller and drives bottlenecking things as is lost over the powerline connection.

    I'm not getting the greatest speeds transferring large files from my server to other devices, but again, my old hardware is probably as much to blame as anything else, and there's more than enough speed to play high def media files from the server to multiple front-end devices, so good enough.

    But, for inexpensively extending your wired network for just internet connectivity I can definitely recommend these powerline adapters.

  4. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Gink For This Useful Post:

    DeadChaos (04-26-2017), Major Stains (04-25-2017), SouthtownSlayer (04-26-2017), TonkaToys (04-25-2017)

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